Afghanistan Election Data

Open Data

Map Tiles for OpenLayers, Google Maps, & Maps on a Stick

These custom map tiles for Afghanistan provide the basis for a visually rich online map browsing experience with the ability to zoom and pan maps. Additional data can be displayed over tiles, like is done elsewhere on this site. The map tiles below are provided free for use on other websites. Citations for data are included with each tileset, and documentation for using map tiles on your website are available here.

Baselayers

This is an Afghanistan tileset featuring a light grey hillshade background, international borders, provincial and district borders of Afghanistan, roads, and labels in English for countries, provinces, and district centers.

Features & Data source overview

National-level borders for surrounding countries are from Natural Earth. The border for Afghanistan itself is from AGCHO.

Country labels for Afghanistan and its surrounding countries are a custom data set created by Development Seed based on data from Wikipedia.

Provinces & districts of Afghanistan are from AGCHO, as are the district administrative centers.

Roads of Afghanistan, rendered as orange lines, are from AGCHO and included as a general illustration of the nation's major infrastructure (not for navigational purposes). The map also includes airports and airfields provided by iMMAP

Hillshades are rendered from CGIAR's SRTM digital elevation model dataset. Elevation contour lines which appear at higher zoomlevels were also generated from this source.

Water bodies, including oceans, are from OpenStreetMap. Additional lakes, as well as rivers and streams are included from AGCHO.

This is an Afghanistan tileset, featuring a light grey hillshaded background, international borders, provincial and district borders of Afghanistan, roads, and labels in Dari for countries, provinces, and district centers.

Features & Data source overview

National-level borders for surrounding countries are from Natural Earth. The border for Afghanistan itself is from AGCHO.

Country labels for Afghanistan and its surrounding countries are a custom data set created by Development Seed based on data from Wikipedia.

Provinces & districts of Afghanistan are from AGCHO, as are the district administrative centers.

Roads of Afghanistan, rendered as orange lines, are from AGCHO and included as a general illustration of the nation's major infrastructure (not for navigational purposes). The map also includes airports and airfields provided by iMMAP.

Hillshades are rendered from CGIAR's SRTM digital elevation model dataset. Elevation contour lines which appear at higher zoomlevels were also generated from this source.

Water bodies, including oceans, are from OpenStreetMap. Additional lakes, as well as rivers and streams are included from AGCHO.

This is an Afghanistan tileset, featuring a colored background based on landcover, international borders, provincial and district borders of Afghanistan, roads, and labels in English for countries, provinces, and district centers.

Features & Data source overview

National-level borders for surrounding countries are from Natural Earth. The border for Afghanistan itself is from AGCHO.

Country labels for Afghanistan and its surrounding countries are a custom data set created by Development Seed based on data from Wikipedia.

Provinces & districts of Afghanistan are from AGCHO, as are the district administrative centers.

Roads of Afghanistan, rendered as orange lines, are from AGCHO and included as a general illustration of the nation's major infrastructure (not for navigational purposes). The map also includes airports and airfields provided by iMMAP

Elevation contour lines which appear at higher zoomlevels were generated from CGIAR's SRTM digital elevation model dataset..

Landcover information is provided by AIMS, and illustrates 8 general types of land: settlements, agriculture, forest, marsh, field, sand/rock, sand dunes, and permanent snow.

Water bodies, including oceans, are from OpenStreetMap. Additional lakes, as well as rivers and streams are included from AGCHO.

This is an Afghanistan tileset, featuring a colored background based on landcover, international borders, provincial and district borders of Afghanistan, roads, and labels in Dari for countries, provinces, and district centers.

Features & Data source overview

National-level borders for surrounding countries are from Natural Earth. The border for Afghanistan itself is from AGCHO.

Country labels for Afghanistan and its surrounding countries are a custom data set created by Development Seed based on data from Wikipedia.

Provinces & districts of Afghanistan are from AGCHO, as are the district administrative centers.

Roads of Afghanistan, rendered as orange lines, are from AGCHO and included as a general illustration of the nation's major infrastructure (not for navigational purposes). The map also includes airports and airfields provided by iMMAP

Elevation contour lines which appear at higher zoomlevels were generated from CGIAR's SRTM digital elevation model dataset..

Landcover information is provided by AIMS, and illustrates 8 general types of land: settlements, agriculture, forest, marsh, field, sand/rock, sand dunes, and permanent snow.

Water bodies, including oceans, are from OpenStreetMap. Additional lakes, as well as rivers and streams are included from AGCHO.

Overlays

This map is based on a data set generated by the GREG project, which is based at the International Conflict Research Group at the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology (ETH) in Zurich. Scholars from ETH, in collaboration with the Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU) - Trondheim worked to digitize the Soviet Atlas Narodov Mira. Released in 1964, this atlas was created by Soviet ethnographers and takes into account more than 900 ethnic groups. Despite being over four decades old, the Atlas Narodov Mira is widely considered to be the most complete and accurate source of the worldwide spatial distributions of ethnic groups available today. More information can be found on the dataset website.

This map visualizes the percent of people that reported paying a bribe in 2009, according to Integrity Watch Afghanistan's (an anti-corruption watchdog) in their recent survey of 6.500 people, conducted in late 2009 and covering 32 provinces. The findings from the survey show that bribery has doubled since 2007, and "50% of survey respondents consider that corruption fosters the expansion of the Taliban and one third reported it to cause conflict at local level, mainly related to land issues." IAW's full report was published in early July 2010 and is available for download in both English, Dari, and Pashto.

Again, more information can be found here.

This map shows the percentage of candidates that are female, per province, in the 2010 Wolesi Jirga elections.

This map shows the percentage of candidates that are affiliated with a political party, per province, in the 2010 Wolesi Jirga elections.

This map shows the ratio of ballots cast to the number of registered voters in each province for the 2005 Wolesi Jirga elections.

This map shows the percentage of ballots cast that were either blank or invalid, by province, in the 2005 Wolesi Jirga Elections.

This map shows the percentage of candidates that were women, per province, in the 2005 Wolesi Jirga elections.

This map shows the percentage of total votes that were cast by women, by province, in the 2004 Afghanistan Presidential Elections.

This map shows the percentage of ballots cast that were either blank or invalid, by province, in the 2004 Afghanistan Presidential Elections.

This map shows the percentage of votes won by Karzai, per province, in the 2004 Presidential Election.

This overlay shows the change the number of security incidents in each province on election day from 2009 to 2010. A change of 0 does not necessarily mean no incidents occurred - the intent of this overlay is to show how much security improved or worsened from the previous election.

The map was created using data provided to NDI by iMMAP, who aggregate and georeference/map reports from a number of UN, embassy, government, news, and other sources. The data cannot be considered comprehensive, as not all incidents are reported and others are only georeference to district or province level.